Blog To Express

A blogosphere learning experience to express with blog

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Location: Singapore, Singapore

A "recycled teenager" learning to blog.

Feb 23, 2011

MyPaper - February 7, 2011

Sources: "MyPaper" dated February 7, 2011. Thanks to Jerome Lim who tagged a photo of us in the "On a little street in Singapore" group on Facebook.

The photos of "MyPaper" published on February 7, 2011 and translated the Chinese article into English with the help of LKM, Andy Lim's friend of "Singapore 60s: Andy's Pop Music Influence" blog.

Archiving Bloggers' History - An interview with Icemoon of "2nd Shot" and Jerome Lim of "The Long and the Winding Road" blogs.

"Briefly the report is about the importance and the technological challenges faced to archive digital histories that some bloggers are writing on various aspects of a community's culture e.g. food, housing, entertainment.

In an interview with My Paper, Mr *Paul Arthur, an Aussie scholar in digital histories, opined the need to systemically archive bloggers thinking and reminisces of history. He said this is an enormous and challenging task technologically.

The main challenge is how to preserve the interactive nature of a blog as an archive, given its digital links. Some local bloggers e.g. 2nd Short interviewed felt that blogs of historical value should be archived. The NLB is studying the possibility of doing so.

The side report presented the argument whether a blogger's personal perception of history can qualify to be archived as official history. The President of the Singapore Heritage Society thought an individual's reminisces of history are important as they reflect the experiences of grassroot level of society while Mr Arthur opined that over the past 20 years, history scholars have given more attention to the study of individuals' personal accounts of life experiences because they can reflect certain turning points in history.

The Report mentioned that there are a number of local blogs on historical and cultural heritage worth archiving. The best method is to systemtically group them in various categories in www to facilitate accessibility from public."

Images: from 'My Paper'

*Paul Arthur: www.paularthur.com

Blogs cited in newspaper article:

http://www.goodmorningyesterday.blogspot.com

http://www.blogtoexpress.blogspot.com

http://www.bullockcartwater.blogspot.com

http://www.singapore60smusic.blogspot.com

www.thelongnwindingroad.wordpress.com

http://www.singapore1960s.blogspot.com

http://www.2ndshot.blogspot.com
Sources: "MyPaper" dated February 7, 2011.

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4 Comments:

Blogger Lam Chun See said...

When Char Lee and I presented our paper on Capturing Memories through Blogs at last year's When Nation Remember conference, I asked the NLB to distribute to our participants an excellent paper on this subject written by Ms Stephanie Ho of the History Workroom.

Her paper was titled, Blogs as Public History. She used my blog Good Morning Yesterday and Yesterday.sg as case studies to illustrate her points.

In a nutshell, she was of the view that; "Blogging is a form of public history as it increases public resources on the past and encourages more democratic history-making processes ... and promotes more active engagement with the past."

February 25, 2011 at 9:42 PM  
Blogger Andy Young* said...

Hooray to all Singapore bloggers. At the end of it all, our youths benefit from the island's rich heritage.

Cheers.

February 25, 2011 at 9:46 PM  
Blogger Thimbuktu said...

Well done, Chun See and Char Lee.

Thanks to Ms Stephanie Ho of the History Workoom.

Stephanie has written a book about
Samsui women too.

Cheers!

February 25, 2011 at 10:15 PM  
Blogger Thimbuktu said...

The list of Singapore social history blogs in the MyPaper is incomplete and an increasing number of fellow bloggers are coming forward to share with us.

Please also check them at "Blogs Of The Same Feather" and add their blogs and would like to welcome everyone with similar themes of interests.

Thank you.
Thimbuktu

February 25, 2011 at 11:49 PM  

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